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View apeiron_universe_'s Instagram Supergiant Star Gamma Cygni: Supergiant star Gamma Cygni lies at the center of the Northern Cross, a famous asterismin the constellation of the Swan (Cygnus). Known by the proper name Sadr, the bright star also lies at the center of this gorgeous skyscape, featuring a complex of stars, dust clouds, and glowing nebulae along the plane of our Milky Way galaxy. The field of view spans over 3 degrees (six Full Moons) on the sky and includes emission nebula IC 1318 and open star cluster NGC 6910. Left of Gamma Cygniand shaped  like two glowing cosmic wings divided by a long dark dust lane, IC 1318's popular name is understandably the Butterfly Nebula. Above and slightly left of Gamma Cygni, are the young, still tightly grouped stars of NGC 6910. Some distance estimates for Gamma Cygni place it at around 1800 light-years while estimates for IC 1318 and NGC 6910 range from 2,000 to 5,000 light-years.
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 Image Credit & Copyright: Jose Francisco Hernandez (Altamira Observatory. 1453631955949461156_1471303724

Supergiant Star Gamma Cygni: Supergiant star Gamma Cygni lies at the center of the Northern Cross, a famous asterismin the constellation of the Swan (Cygnus). Known by the proper name Sadr, the bright star also lies at the center of this gorgeous skyscape, featuring a complex of stars, dust clouds, and glowing nebulae along the plane of our Milky Way galaxy. The field of view spans over 3 degrees (six Full Moons) on the sky and includes emission nebula IC 1318 and open star cluster NGC 6910. Left of Gamma Cygniand shaped  like two glowing cosmic wings divided by a long dark dust lane, IC 1318's popular name is understandably the Butterfly Nebula. Above and slightly left of Gamma Cygni, are the young, still tightly grouped stars of NGC 6910. Some distance estimates for Gamma Cygni place it at around 1800 light-years while estimates for IC 1318 and NGC 6910 range from 2,000 to 5,000 light-years. . .  Image Credit & Copyright: Jose Francisco Hernandez (Altamira Observatory.

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View apeiron_universe_'s Instagram M82: Starburst Galaxy with a Superwind: Also known as the Cigar Galaxy for its elongated visual appearance, M82 is a starburst galaxy with a superwind. In fact, through ensuing supernova explosions and powerful winds from massive stars, the burst of star formation in M82 is driving a prodigious outflow. Evidence for the superwind from the galaxy's central regions is clear in this sharp telescopic snapshot. The composite image highlights emission from long outflow filaments of atomic hydrogen gas in reddish hues. Some of the gas in the superwind, enriched in heavy elements forged in the massive stars, will eventually escape into intergalactic space. Including narrow band image data in the deep exposure has revealed a faint feature dubbed the cap. Perched about 35,000 light-years above the galaxy at the upper left, the cap appears to be galactic halo material. The material has been ionized by the superwind shock or intense ultraviolet radiation from the young, massive stars in the galaxy's core. Triggered by a close encounter with nearby large galaxy M81, the furious burst of star formation in M82 should last about 100 million years or so. M82 is 12 million light-years distant, near the northern boundary of Ursa Major.
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Image Credit & Copyright: Ken Crawford (Rancho Del Sol Obs.) / Nasa/ Hubble/ Esa. 1453628485305485338_1471303724

M82: Starburst Galaxy with a Superwind: Also known as the Cigar Galaxy for its elongated visual appearance, M82 is a starburst galaxy with a superwind. In fact, through ensuing supernova explosions and powerful winds from massive stars, the burst of star formation in M82 is driving a prodigious outflow. Evidence for the superwind from the galaxy's central regions is clear in this sharp telescopic snapshot. The composite image highlights emission from long outflow filaments of atomic hydrogen gas in reddish hues. Some of the gas in the superwind, enriched in heavy elements forged in the massive stars, will eventually escape into intergalactic space. Including narrow band image data in the deep exposure has revealed a faint feature dubbed the cap. Perched about 35,000 light-years above the galaxy at the upper left, the cap appears to be galactic halo material. The material has been ionized by the superwind shock or intense ultraviolet radiation from the young, massive stars in the galaxy's core. Triggered by a close encounter with nearby large galaxy M81, the furious burst of star formation in M82 should last about 100 million years or so. M82 is 12 million light-years distant, near the northern boundary of Ursa Major. . . Image Credit & Copyright: Ken Crawford (Rancho Del Sol Obs.) / Nasa/ Hubble/ Esa.

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View astrophysicsig's Instagram Image: Elliptical Galaxy IC1101
Credit: NASA/ESA 
The largest and some of the smallest galaxies are elliptical galaxies. These types of galaxies are the most numerous type of galaxy in the cosmos, although because most elliptical galaxies are quite small, it doesn't appear that way. However, the largest galaxies in the universe are ellipticals. 
It's been said that if you've seen one elliptical galaxy then you've seen them all. Unlike spiral or irregular galaxies, elliptical galaxies have no unique structure, other than of course their oval shape. Also unlike spirals and irregulars, ellipticals contain high proportions of old stars. This has given ellipticals the nickname of being the retirement homes of the cosmos. Little to no star formation occurs in ellipticals, so no new stars are born. Over time, the higher mass stars die out and only the older, lower mass stars are left. 
Current models of galaxy formation suggest that most ellipticals likely formed due to the collisions of spiral galaxies. Because the universe is always expanding, the early universe was much smaller than it is today. And because the universe has always contained the same amount of matter and energy, galaxies were much closer together in the early universe. Because of this, galaxy collisions took place quite frequently. Since a typical galaxy collisions will take millions of years, this does explain why there are much more elliptical galaxies today than in the early universe. Also, this model explains why star formation no longer takes place in ellipticals. During a typical galaxy collision, tidal interactions and collisions between gas clouds cause huge waves of star formation to take place, resulting in the star forming material being used up at a much quicker rate than usual. 
#astronomy #astronomer #astrophysics #space #cosmos #science #physics #universe #stars #planet #astronaut #constellation #interstellar #spacetravel #outerspace #sun #chandra #astrobiology #NASA #Hubble #telescope #galaxy #stargazing #starstuff #creation #photography #astrophotography #amazing #explore #nasabeyond 1453625951316592977_4008710248

Image: Elliptical Galaxy IC1101 Credit: NASA/ESA The largest and some of the smallest galaxies are elliptical galaxies. These types of galaxies are the most numerous type of galaxy in the cosmos, although because most elliptical galaxies are quite small, it doesn't appear that way. However, the largest galaxies in the universe are ellipticals. It's been said that if you've seen one elliptical galaxy then you've seen them all. Unlike spiral or irregular galaxies, elliptical galaxies have no unique structure, other than of course their oval shape. Also unlike spirals and irregulars, ellipticals contain high proportions of old stars. This has given ellipticals the nickname of being the retirement homes of the cosmos. Little to no star formation occurs in ellipticals, so no new stars are born. Over time, the higher mass stars die out and only the older, lower mass stars are left. Current models of galaxy formation suggest that most ellipticals likely formed due to the collisions of spiral galaxies. Because the universe is always expanding, the early universe was much smaller than it is today. And because the universe has always contained the same amount of matter and energy, galaxies were much closer together in the early universe. Because of this, galaxy collisions took place quite frequently. Since a typical galaxy collisions will take millions of years, this does explain why there are much more elliptical galaxies today than in the early universe. Also, this model explains why star formation no longer takes place in ellipticals. During a typical galaxy collision, tidal interactions and collisions between gas clouds cause huge waves of star formation to take place, resulting in the star forming material being used up at a much quicker rate than usual. #astronomy #astronomer #astrophysics #space #cosmos #science #physics #universe #stars #planet #astronaut #constellation #interstellar #spacetravel #outerspace #sun #chandra #astrobiology #nasa #hubble #telescope #galaxy #stargazing #starstuff #creation #photography #astrophotography #amazing #explore #nasabeyond

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View seiseidoudou's Instagram Repost from @nasa 
Frozen Canyons of Pluto's North Pole: This ethereal scene captured by our New Horizons spacecraft tells yet another story of Pluto's diversity of geological and compositional features-this time in an enhanced color image of the north polar area. Long canyons run vertically across the polar area. The widest of the canyons is about 45 miles (75 kilometers) wide and runs close to the north pole. The degraded walls of these canyons appear to be much older than the more sharply defined canyon systems elsewhere on Pluto, perhaps because the polar canyons are older and made of weaker material. These canyons also appear to represent evidence for an ancient period of tectonics. 
Credits: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI

#nasa #space #pluto #plutoflyby #solarsystem #astronomy #nasabeyond #geology #science
😵💕 1453582160182358969_1529062277

Repost from @nasa Frozen Canyons of Pluto's North Pole: This ethereal scene captured by our New Horizons spacecraft tells yet another story of Pluto's diversity of geological and compositional features-this time in an enhanced color image of the north polar area. Long canyons run vertically across the polar area. The widest of the canyons is about 45 miles (75 kilometers) wide and runs close to the north pole. The degraded walls of these canyons appear to be much older than the more sharply defined canyon systems elsewhere on Pluto, perhaps because the polar canyons are older and made of weaker material. These canyons also appear to represent evidence for an ancient period of tectonics. Credits: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI #nasa #space #pluto #plutoflyby #solarsystem #astronomy #nasabeyond #geology #science 😵💕

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View einsteinwong89's Instagram This post was reposted using @the.instasave.app  #theinstasaveapp
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"While this lovely image contains hundreds of distant stars and galaxies, one vital thing is missing - the object Hubble was actually studying at the time! This is not because the target has disappeared. The telescope's camera actually uses two detectors: the first captures the object being studied - in this case an open star cluster known as NGC 299 - while the other detector images the patch of space just 'beneath' it. This is what can be seen here. Technically, this picture is merely a sidekick of the actual object of interest - but space is bursting with activity, and this field of bright celestial bodies offers plenty of interest on its own. It may initially seem to show just stars, but a closer look reveals many of these tiny objects to be galaxies. The spiral galaxies have arms curving out from a bright center. The fuzzier, less clearly shaped galaxies might be ellipticals. Some of these galaxies contain millions or even billions of stars, but are so distant that all of their starry residents are contained within just a small pinprick of light that appears to be the same size as a single star!
The bright blue dots are very hot stars, sometimes distorted into crosses by the struts supporting Hubble's secondary mirror. The redder dots are cooler stars, possibly in the red giant phase when a dying star cools and expands.

Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

#nasa #space #hubble #hst #astronomy #galaxy #stars #nasabeyond #science" 1453558065559010217_3257593209

This post was reposted using @the.instasave.app #theinstasaveapp ・・・ "While this lovely image contains hundreds of distant stars and galaxies, one vital thing is missing - the object Hubble was actually studying at the time! This is not because the target has disappeared. The telescope's camera actually uses two detectors: the first captures the object being studied - in this case an open star cluster known as NGC 299 - while the other detector images the patch of space just 'beneath' it. This is what can be seen here. Technically, this picture is merely a sidekick of the actual object of interest - but space is bursting with activity, and this field of bright celestial bodies offers plenty of interest on its own. It may initially seem to show just stars, but a closer look reveals many of these tiny objects to be galaxies. The spiral galaxies have arms curving out from a bright center. The fuzzier, less clearly shaped galaxies might be ellipticals. Some of these galaxies contain millions or even billions of stars, but are so distant that all of their starry residents are contained within just a small pinprick of light that appears to be the same size as a single star! The bright blue dots are very hot stars, sometimes distorted into crosses by the struts supporting Hubble's secondary mirror. The redder dots are cooler stars, possibly in the red giant phase when a dying star cools and expands. Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA #nasa #space #hubble #hst #astronomy #galaxy #stars #nasabeyond #science"

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View boba_fett25's Instagram #Repost @nasa
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While this lovely image contains hundreds of distant stars and galaxies, one vital thing is missing - the object Hubble was actually studying at the time! This is not because the target has disappeared. The telescope's camera actually uses two detectors: the first captures the object being studied - in this case an open star cluster known as NGC 299 - while the other detector images the patch of space just 'beneath' it. This is what can be seen here. Technically, this picture is merely a sidekick of the actual object of interest - but space is bursting with activity, and this field of bright celestial bodies offers plenty of interest on its own. It may initially seem to show just stars, but a closer look reveals many of these tiny objects to be galaxies. The spiral galaxies have arms curving out from a bright center. The fuzzier, less clearly shaped galaxies might be ellipticals. Some of these galaxies contain millions or even billions of stars, but are so distant that all of their starry residents are contained within just a small pinprick of light that appears to be the same size as a single star!
The bright blue dots are very hot stars, sometimes distorted into crosses by the struts supporting Hubble's secondary mirror. The redder dots are cooler stars, possibly in the red giant phase when a dying star cools and expands.

Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

#nasa #space #hubble #hst #astronomy #galaxy #stars #nasabeyond #science #universe 1453553439174127932_678750515

#repost@nasa ・・・ While this lovely image contains hundreds of distant stars and galaxies, one vital thing is missing - the object Hubble was actually studying at the time! This is not because the target has disappeared. The telescope's camera actually uses two detectors: the first captures the object being studied - in this case an open star cluster known as NGC 299 - while the other detector images the patch of space just 'beneath' it. This is what can be seen here. Technically, this picture is merely a sidekick of the actual object of interest - but space is bursting with activity, and this field of bright celestial bodies offers plenty of interest on its own. It may initially seem to show just stars, but a closer look reveals many of these tiny objects to be galaxies. The spiral galaxies have arms curving out from a bright center. The fuzzier, less clearly shaped galaxies might be ellipticals. Some of these galaxies contain millions or even billions of stars, but are so distant that all of their starry residents are contained within just a small pinprick of light that appears to be the same size as a single star! The bright blue dots are very hot stars, sometimes distorted into crosses by the struts supporting Hubble's secondary mirror. The redder dots are cooler stars, possibly in the red giant phase when a dying star cools and expands. Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA #nasa #space #hubble #hst #astronomy #galaxy #stars #nasabeyond #science #universe

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View astrophysicsig's Instagram The Orion Nebula is perhaps the most famous nebula in the night sky and is definitely one of the most beautiful. Located around 1,500 light years in the constellation of Orion, the Orion Nebula is one of the few nebulae that's actually visible to the naked eye. Seen just below Orion's Belt in the sword, the Orion Nebula looks like a "fuzzy star." To the naked eye, no actual detail can be seen. Yet with even a small telescope, some detail can be seen, yet none of those views are even close to the images taken by the Hubble. 
The Orion Nebula spans an area of space about 30 light years across and is one of the closest active star forming regions to our solar system. This has made Orion a popular target for astronomers. Studying the nebula has greatly improved scientists understanding of stellar formation and evolution. Yet star formation isn't the only factor that makes the Orion Nebula such an intensely studied area. Astronomers have spotted a large number of protoplanetary discs, which are discs of stellar material that form around young stars. These discs are the birth places of solar systems, which have revolutionized our understanding of how solar systems form. Also, scientists have detected a multitude of brown dwarf stars, which are basically objects that are too large to be a planet and are too small to be a star. 
Every winter in the Northern Hemisphere, the constellation of Orion dominates the night sky. So if you're in the Norther Hemisphere this winter, make sure to take a look at Orion. And if you have a good pair of binoculars or a good telescope, take a look at the Orion Nebula. 
Well, this ain't an image taken by the Hubble, this image had been taken at home and yeah it is possible to take images like this with proper skills and equipments; camera, telescope. 
#astronomy #astronomer #astrophysics #space #cosmos #science #physics #universe #stars #planet #astronaut #constellation #interstellar #spacetravel #outerspace #sun #chandra #astrobiology #NASA #Hubble #telescope #galaxy #stargazing #starstuff #creation #photography #astrophotography #amazing #explore #nasabeyond 1453543917533426112_4008710248

The Orion Nebula is perhaps the most famous nebula in the night sky and is definitely one of the most beautiful. Located around 1,500 light years in the constellation of Orion, the Orion Nebula is one of the few nebulae that's actually visible to the naked eye. Seen just below Orion's Belt in the sword, the Orion Nebula looks like a "fuzzy star." To the naked eye, no actual detail can be seen. Yet with even a small telescope, some detail can be seen, yet none of those views are even close to the images taken by the Hubble. The Orion Nebula spans an area of space about 30 light years across and is one of the closest active star forming regions to our solar system. This has made Orion a popular target for astronomers. Studying the nebula has greatly improved scientists understanding of stellar formation and evolution. Yet star formation isn't the only factor that makes the Orion Nebula such an intensely studied area. Astronomers have spotted a large number of protoplanetary discs, which are discs of stellar material that form around young stars. These discs are the birth places of solar systems, which have revolutionized our understanding of how solar systems form. Also, scientists have detected a multitude of brown dwarf stars, which are basically objects that are too large to be a planet and are too small to be a star. Every winter in the Northern Hemisphere, the constellation of Orion dominates the night sky. So if you're in the Norther Hemisphere this winter, make sure to take a look at Orion. And if you have a good pair of binoculars or a good telescope, take a look at the Orion Nebula. Well, this ain't an image taken by the Hubble, this image had been taken at home and yeah it is possible to take images like this with proper skills and equipments; camera, telescope. #astronomy #astronomer #astrophysics #space #cosmos #science #physics #universe #stars #planet #astronaut #constellation #interstellar #spacetravel #outerspace #sun #chandra #astrobiology #nasa #hubble #telescope #galaxy #stargazing #starstuff #creation #photography #astrophotography #amazing #explore #nasabeyond

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View roguzdon's Instagram And last one for this set.
Had fun with these-! #drawingOfThe3

2017.02.18: Not #Saturn - 3 of 3 1453518372486839673_5914467

And last one for this set. Had fun with these-! #drawingOfThe3 2017.02.18: Not #saturn- 3 of 3

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View astrophysicsig's Instagram How big are the stars that were observed in the Tarantula Nebula? In this image we can see the sizes of a Red Dwarf, Yellow Dwarf like our Sun, a Blue Dwarf and then the enormous R136a1. The most massive star ever to be found in this universe, 250-300 times the mass of Sun. 
Artist's impression by ESO/M. Kornmesser

#astronomy #astronomer #astrophysics #space #cosmos #science #physics #universe #stars #planet #astronaut #constellation #interstellar #spacetravel #outerspace #sun #chandra #astrobiology #NASA #Hubble #telescope #galaxy #stargazing #starstuff #creation #photography #astrophotography #amazing #explore #nasabeyond 1453515605637368774_4008710248

How big are the stars that were observed in the Tarantula Nebula? In this image we can see the sizes of a Red Dwarf, Yellow Dwarf like our Sun, a Blue Dwarf and then the enormous R136a1. The most massive star ever to be found in this universe, 250-300 times the mass of Sun. Artist's impression by ESO/M. Kornmesser #astronomy #astronomer #astrophysics #space #cosmos #science #physics #universe #stars #planet #astronaut #constellation #interstellar #spacetravel #outerspace #sun #chandra #astrobiology #nasa #hubble #telescope #galaxy #stargazing #starstuff #creation #photography #astrophotography #amazing #explore #nasabeyond

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View astrophysicsig's Instagram Supernova Remnant LMC DEM L 190
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Denoted N 49, or DEM L 190, this remnant is from a massive star that died in a supernova blast whose light would have reached Earth years ago. This seemingly gentle structure also harbors a very powerful spinning neutron star that may be the central remnant from the initial blast. It is quite common for the core of an exploded supernova star to become a spinning neutron star (also called a pulsar because of the regular pulses of energy from the rotational spin) after the immediate shedding of the star's outer layers. In the case of N 49, not only is the neutron star spinning at a rate of once every 8 seconds, it also has a super-strong magnetic field a thousand trillion times stronger than Earth's magnetic field. This places this star into the exclusive class of objects called magnetars.

#astronomy #astronomer #astrophysics #space #cosmos #science #physics #universe #stars #planet #astronaut #constellation #interstellar #spacetravel #outerspace #sun #chandra #astrobiology #NASA #Hubble #telescope #galaxy #stargazing #starstuff #creation #photography #astrophotography #amazing #explore #nasabeyond 1453509557375502997_4008710248

Supernova Remnant LMC DEM L 190 . Denoted N 49, or DEM L 190, this remnant is from a massive star that died in a supernova blast whose light would have reached Earth years ago. This seemingly gentle structure also harbors a very powerful spinning neutron star that may be the central remnant from the initial blast. It is quite common for the core of an exploded supernova star to become a spinning neutron star (also called a pulsar because of the regular pulses of energy from the rotational spin) after the immediate shedding of the star's outer layers. In the case of N 49, not only is the neutron star spinning at a rate of once every 8 seconds, it also has a super-strong magnetic field a thousand trillion times stronger than Earth's magnetic field. This places this star into the exclusive class of objects called magnetars. #astronomy #astronomer #astrophysics #space #cosmos #science #physics #universe #stars #planet #astronaut #constellation #interstellar #spacetravel #outerspace #sun #chandra #astrobiology #nasa #hubble #telescope #galaxy #stargazing #starstuff #creation #photography #astrophotography #amazing #explore #nasabeyond

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View astrophysicsig's Instagram Dusty Environs of Eta Carinae
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Eta Car is a massive star, but it's not as bright as it used to be. Now only easily visible in binoculars or a small telescope, Eta Carinae has a history of spectacular flaring and fading behavior. In fact, in April of 1843 Eta Car briefly became second only to Sirius as the brightest star in planet Earth's night sky, even though at a distance of about 7,500 light-years, it is about 800 times farther away. Surrounded by a complex and evolving nebula, Eta Carinae is seen near the center of this false-color infrared image, constructed using data from the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX). The MSX satellite mapped the galactic plane in 1996. In the picture, wispy, convoluted filaments are clouds of dust glowing at infrared wavelengths. Astronomers hypothesize that Eta Car itself will explode as a supernova in the next million years or so. Massive Eta Car has even been considered a candidate for a hypernova explosion and the potential source of a future gamma-ray burst.
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#astronomy #astronomer #astrophysics #space #cosmos #science #physics #universe #stars #planet #astronaut #constellation #interstellar #spacetravel #outerspace #sun #chandra #astrobiology #NASA #Hubble #telescope #galaxy #stargazing #starstuff #creation #photography #astrophotography #amazing #explore #nasabeyond 1453506430270317109_4008710248

Dusty Environs of Eta Carinae . . Eta Car is a massive star, but it's not as bright as it used to be. Now only easily visible in binoculars or a small telescope, Eta Carinae has a history of spectacular flaring and fading behavior. In fact, in April of 1843 Eta Car briefly became second only to Sirius as the brightest star in planet Earth's night sky, even though at a distance of about 7,500 light-years, it is about 800 times farther away. Surrounded by a complex and evolving nebula, Eta Carinae is seen near the center of this false-color infrared image, constructed using data from the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX). The MSX satellite mapped the galactic plane in 1996. In the picture, wispy, convoluted filaments are clouds of dust glowing at infrared wavelengths. Astronomers hypothesize that Eta Car itself will explode as a supernova in the next million years or so. Massive Eta Car has even been considered a candidate for a hypernova explosion and the potential source of a future gamma-ray burst. . #astronomy #astronomer #astrophysics #space #cosmos #science #physics #universe #stars #planet #astronaut #constellation #interstellar #spacetravel #outerspace #sun #chandra #astrobiology #nasa #hubble #telescope #galaxy #stargazing #starstuff #creation #photography #astrophotography #amazing #explore #nasabeyond

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View apeiron_universe_'s Instagram Via @astromillennium -  IRAS 20324: Evaporating Protostar.
Protostars are contracting accumulates of gas that represent an early stage in the formation of a star. IRAS 2034+4057 spans about one lightyear and lies about 4,500 light years away towards the constellation of Cygnus the Swan. The above image was taken in 2006, but only released in 2014. The battle between light and gravity will most likely take over 100,000 years to play out. What happens after is anyone’s guess. Clever observations by scientists at NASA and the ESA indicate any new star formed from this star could one day expand into a planetary nebula, or could explode in a magnificent supernova. OR it could additionally cool enough to become a brown dwarf, or expand enough to become a more habitable main sequence star.
Photo Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA), and IPHAS
Source: NASA APOD (2014 September 4) 1453483390832820151_1471303724

Via @astromillennium - IRAS 20324: Evaporating Protostar. Protostars are contracting accumulates of gas that represent an early stage in the formation of a star. IRAS 2034+4057 spans about one lightyear and lies about 4,500 light years away towards the constellation of Cygnus the Swan. The above image was taken in 2006, but only released in 2014. The battle between light and gravity will most likely take over 100,000 years to play out. What happens after is anyone’s guess. Clever observations by scientists at NASA and the ESA indicate any new star formed from this star could one day expand into a planetary nebula, or could explode in a magnificent supernova. OR it could additionally cool enough to become a brown dwarf, or expand enough to become a more habitable main sequence star. Photo Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA), and IPHAS Source: NASA APOD (2014 September 4)

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View astrophysicsig's Instagram Every time you open your eyes, the first thing you see is light. In fact, it's the only thing we see. Strangely, light remained largely a mystery until only a couple centuries ago with the work of pioneering scientists. 
For years, scientists debated the precise nature of light. Isaac Newton proposed that light was composed of countless tiny particles, what we now call photons. Other scientists, such as Christiaan Huygens, proposed that light was in fact a wave. Due to Newton's popularity at the time, the particle model was accepted by most scientists. This all changed when Thomas Young performed the famous double slit experiment. When light passed through a two slit panel, it produced what's called an interference pattern. An interference pattern can only be produced by waves, and thus the wave model of light was accepted. Today we know that light is in fact made up of particles called photons, yet it also behaves like a wave. 
Another breakthrough came in the 1800s. In the 1800s, Michael Faraday proposed the concept of the "field" or "action at a distance." Objects, he proposed, could interact with each other without touching via a field. An electric charge creates an electric field; a 3D region of influence surrounding an object. Faraday also showed that the electric force and the magnetic force were somehow related. A magnet was able to produce an electric current. Unfortunately, Faraday lacked a formal education and was not able to mathematically combine electricity and magnetism. Another scientists would be the one to figure out the relationship between these two forces.

In 1865, James Clerk Maxwell proposed the Electromagnetic Theory. Maxwell proposed that a changing electric field produces a changing magnetic field and that the interaction between these two fields propagates as a wave through space. Electromagnetic waves, he predicted, moved at a speed of around 300,000 km/s. This speed also happens to be the speed of light. This fact led to a remarkable breakthrough: light is an electromagnetic wave. 1453473668637199649_4008710248

Every time you open your eyes, the first thing you see is light. In fact, it's the only thing we see. Strangely, light remained largely a mystery until only a couple centuries ago with the work of pioneering scientists. For years, scientists debated the precise nature of light. Isaac Newton proposed that light was composed of countless tiny particles, what we now call photons. Other scientists, such as Christiaan Huygens, proposed that light was in fact a wave. Due to Newton's popularity at the time, the particle model was accepted by most scientists. This all changed when Thomas Young performed the famous double slit experiment. When light passed through a two slit panel, it produced what's called an interference pattern. An interference pattern can only be produced by waves, and thus the wave model of light was accepted. Today we know that light is in fact made up of particles called photons, yet it also behaves like a wave. Another breakthrough came in the 1800s. In the 1800s, Michael Faraday proposed the concept of the "field" or "action at a distance." Objects, he proposed, could interact with each other without touching via a field. An electric charge creates an electric field; a 3D region of influence surrounding an object. Faraday also showed that the electric force and the magnetic force were somehow related. A magnet was able to produce an electric current. Unfortunately, Faraday lacked a formal education and was not able to mathematically combine electricity and magnetism. Another scientists would be the one to figure out the relationship between these two forces. In 1865, James Clerk Maxwell proposed the Electromagnetic Theory. Maxwell proposed that a changing electric field produces a changing magnetic field and that the interaction between these two fields propagates as a wave through space. Electromagnetic waves, he predicted, moved at a speed of around 300,000 km/s. This speed also happens to be the speed of light. This fact led to a remarkable breakthrough: light is an electromagnetic wave.

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View sunny_days365hina's Instagram While this lovely image contains hundreds of distant stars and galaxies, one vital thing is missing - the object Hubble was actually studying at the time! This is not because the target has disappeared. The telescope's camera actually uses two detectors: the first captures the object being studied - in this case an open star cluster known as NGC 299 - while the other detector images the patch of space just 'beneath' it. This is what can be seen here. Technically, this picture is merely a sidekick of the actual object of interest - but space is bursting with activity, and this field of bright celestial bodies offers plenty of interest on its own. It may initially seem to show just stars, but a closer look reveals many of these tiny objects to be galaxies. The spiral galaxies have arms curving out from a bright center. The fuzzier, less clearly shaped galaxies might be ellipticals. Some of these galaxies contain millions or even billions of stars, but are so distant that all of their starry residents are contained within just a small pinprick of light that appears to be the same size as a single star!
The bright blue dots are very hot stars, sometimes distorted into crosses by the struts supporting Hubble's secondary mirror. The redder dots are cooler stars, possibly in the red giant phase when a dying star cools and expands.

Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

#nasa #space #hubble #hst #astronomy #galaxy #stars #nasabeyond #science 1453457746765598175_1797217429

While this lovely image contains hundreds of distant stars and galaxies, one vital thing is missing - the object Hubble was actually studying at the time! This is not because the target has disappeared. The telescope's camera actually uses two detectors: the first captures the object being studied - in this case an open star cluster known as NGC 299 - while the other detector images the patch of space just 'beneath' it. This is what can be seen here. Technically, this picture is merely a sidekick of the actual object of interest - but space is bursting with activity, and this field of bright celestial bodies offers plenty of interest on its own. It may initially seem to show just stars, but a closer look reveals many of these tiny objects to be galaxies. The spiral galaxies have arms curving out from a bright center. The fuzzier, less clearly shaped galaxies might be ellipticals. Some of these galaxies contain millions or even billions of stars, but are so distant that all of their starry residents are contained within just a small pinprick of light that appears to be the same size as a single star! The bright blue dots are very hot stars, sometimes distorted into crosses by the struts supporting Hubble's secondary mirror. The redder dots are cooler stars, possibly in the red giant phase when a dying star cools and expands. Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA #nasa #space #hubble #hst #astronomy #galaxy #stars #nasabeyond #science

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View apeiron_universe_'s Instagram Cosmic Eyeglasses: Messier 78 (also known as NGC 2068) is a reflection nebula and star-forming region of some 10 light-years across, located about 1,600 light-years away in the constellation of Orion, just to the north of Orion’s Belt.

Messier 78 is the brightest diffuse reflection nebula within the Orion B molecular cloud (LDN 1630) that also include NGC 2071, NGC 2067, NGC 2064 and NGC 2024 (the Flame Nebula). As a reflection nebula, M78 is a cloud of interstellar dust which shines in the reflected and scattered light of bright blue supergiant stars, among them the brightest, HD 38563A, and second-brightest HDE 38563B.

Infrared investigations have given a clearer image of the open cluster of young stars which have formed in this nebula. From investigations astronomers concluded that much of the young, embedded star formation is occurring in clusters, including the formation of lower mass stars. They counted a number of 192 stars, spread over an area of 7′ angular diameter.

The two round bluish nebulae, looking like a pair of big eyeglasses, are actually cavities carved out of the surrounding dark dust clouds. The light from young, newborn stars are starting to carve out these cavities within the dust, and eventually, this will become one larger nebula. The extended dust is mostly dark but the edges show up in mid-wavelength infrared light as glowing red frames surrounding the bright interiors.

A string of baby stars that have yet to burn their way through their natal shells can be seen as red pinpoints on the outside of the nebula. Eventually these will blossom into their own glowing balls, turning this two-eyed eyeglass into a many-eyed monster of a nebula.

About 45 variable stars, young stars (less than 10 million years old) still in the process of formation as well as some 17 Herbig-Haro objects are known in Messier 78. These Herbig-Haro objects are presumably jets of matter ejected from young stars embedded in the nebulous matter of M78 where they have just formed.

Messier 78 is easily seen in small telescopes to the naked eye.
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Image credit & copyright: Barry Wilson/ EA-APOD/ Nasa-Jpl-Caltech/ Nasa-Apod. 1453451283242884988_1471303724

Cosmic Eyeglasses: Messier 78 (also known as NGC 2068) is a reflection nebula and star-forming region of some 10 light-years across, located about 1,600 light-years away in the constellation of Orion, just to the north of Orion’s Belt. Messier 78 is the brightest diffuse reflection nebula within the Orion B molecular cloud (LDN 1630) that also include NGC 2071, NGC 2067, NGC 2064 and NGC 2024 (the Flame Nebula). As a reflection nebula, M78 is a cloud of interstellar dust which shines in the reflected and scattered light of bright blue supergiant stars, among them the brightest, HD 38563A, and second-brightest HDE 38563B. Infrared investigations have given a clearer image of the open cluster of young stars which have formed in this nebula. From investigations astronomers concluded that much of the young, embedded star formation is occurring in clusters, including the formation of lower mass stars. They counted a number of 192 stars, spread over an area of 7′ angular diameter. The two round bluish nebulae, looking like a pair of big eyeglasses, are actually cavities carved out of the surrounding dark dust clouds. The light from young, newborn stars are starting to carve out these cavities within the dust, and eventually, this will become one larger nebula. The extended dust is mostly dark but the edges show up in mid-wavelength infrared light as glowing red frames surrounding the bright interiors. A string of baby stars that have yet to burn their way through their natal shells can be seen as red pinpoints on the outside of the nebula. Eventually these will blossom into their own glowing balls, turning this two-eyed eyeglass into a many-eyed monster of a nebula. About 45 variable stars, young stars (less than 10 million years old) still in the process of formation as well as some 17 Herbig-Haro objects are known in Messier 78. These Herbig-Haro objects are presumably jets of matter ejected from young stars embedded in the nebulous matter of M78 where they have just formed. Messier 78 is easily seen in small telescopes to the naked eye. . . Image credit & copyright: Barry Wilson/ EA-APOD/ Nasa-Jpl-Caltech/ Nasa-Apod.

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View totatigre's Instagram regram @nasa
While this lovely image contains hundreds of distant stars and galaxies, one vital thing is missing - the object Hubble was actually studying at the time! This is not because the target has disappeared. The telescope's camera actually uses two detectors: the first captures the object being studied - in this case an open star cluster known as NGC 299 - while the other detector images the patch of space just 'beneath' it. This is what can be seen here. Technically, this picture is merely a sidekick of the actual object of interest - but space is bursting with activity, and this field of bright celestial bodies offers plenty of interest on its own. It may initially seem to show just stars, but a closer look reveals many of these tiny objects to be galaxies. The spiral galaxies have arms curving out from a bright center. The fuzzier, less clearly shaped galaxies might be ellipticals. Some of these galaxies contain millions or even billions of stars, but are so distant that all of their starry residents are contained within just a small pinprick of light that appears to be the same size as a single star!
The bright blue dots are very hot stars, sometimes distorted into crosses by the struts supporting Hubble's secondary mirror. The redder dots are cooler stars, possibly in the red giant phase when a dying star cools and expands.

Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

#nasa #space #hubble #hst #astronomy #galaxy #stars #nasabeyond #science 1453398076341208463_3258154682

regram @nasa While this lovely image contains hundreds of distant stars and galaxies, one vital thing is missing - the object Hubble was actually studying at the time! This is not because the target has disappeared. The telescope's camera actually uses two detectors: the first captures the object being studied - in this case an open star cluster known as NGC 299 - while the other detector images the patch of space just 'beneath' it. This is what can be seen here. Technically, this picture is merely a sidekick of the actual object of interest - but space is bursting with activity, and this field of bright celestial bodies offers plenty of interest on its own. It may initially seem to show just stars, but a closer look reveals many of these tiny objects to be galaxies. The spiral galaxies have arms curving out from a bright center. The fuzzier, less clearly shaped galaxies might be ellipticals. Some of these galaxies contain millions or even billions of stars, but are so distant that all of their starry residents are contained within just a small pinprick of light that appears to be the same size as a single star! The bright blue dots are very hot stars, sometimes distorted into crosses by the struts supporting Hubble's secondary mirror. The redder dots are cooler stars, possibly in the red giant phase when a dying star cools and expands. Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA #nasa #space #hubble #hst #astronomy #galaxy #stars #nasabeyond #science

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View whutchadoin's Instagram @Regrann from @nasa: While this lovely image contains hundreds of distant stars and galaxies, one vital thing is missing - the object Hubble was actually studying at the time! This is not because the target has disappeared. The telescope's camera actually uses two detectors: the first captures the object being studied - in this case an open star cluster known as NGC 299 - while the other detector images the patch of space just 'beneath' it. This is what can be seen here. Technically, this picture is merely a sidekick of the actual object of interest - but space is bursting with activity, and this field of bright celestial bodies offers plenty of interest on its own. It may initially seem to show just stars, but a closer look reveals many of these tiny objects to be galaxies. The spiral galaxies have arms curving out from a bright center. The fuzzier, less clearly shaped galaxies might be ellipticals. Some of these galaxies contain millions or even billions of stars, but are so distant that all of their starry residents are contained within just a small pinprick of light that appears to be the same size as a single star!
The bright blue dots are very hot stars, sometimes distorted into crosses by the struts supporting Hubble's secondary mirror. The redder dots are cooler stars, possibly in the red giant phase when a dying star cools and expands.

Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

#nasa #space #hubble #hst #astronomy #galaxy #stars #nasabeyond #science 1453394037921999364_450678522

@Regrann from @nasa: While this lovely image contains hundreds of distant stars and galaxies, one vital thing is missing - the object Hubble was actually studying at the time! This is not because the target has disappeared. The telescope's camera actually uses two detectors: the first captures the object being studied - in this case an open star cluster known as NGC 299 - while the other detector images the patch of space just 'beneath' it. This is what can be seen here. Technically, this picture is merely a sidekick of the actual object of interest - but space is bursting with activity, and this field of bright celestial bodies offers plenty of interest on its own. It may initially seem to show just stars, but a closer look reveals many of these tiny objects to be galaxies. The spiral galaxies have arms curving out from a bright center. The fuzzier, less clearly shaped galaxies might be ellipticals. Some of these galaxies contain millions or even billions of stars, but are so distant that all of their starry residents are contained within just a small pinprick of light that appears to be the same size as a single star! The bright blue dots are very hot stars, sometimes distorted into crosses by the struts supporting Hubble's secondary mirror. The redder dots are cooler stars, possibly in the red giant phase when a dying star cools and expands. Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA #nasa #space #hubble #hst #astronomy #galaxy #stars #nasabeyond #science

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View maxholden1's Instagram #Repost @thehubblescope with @repostapp
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NGC 3576: Statue of Liberty Nebula
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"And for their sakes I sanctify myself, that they also might be sanctified through the truth."
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What's happening in the Statue of Liberty nebula? Bright stars and interesting molecules are forming and being liberated. The complex nebula resides in the star forming region called RCW 57.  This image showcases dense knots of dark interstellar dust, bright stars that have formed in the past few million years, fields of glowing hydrogen gas ionized by these stars, and great loops of gas expelled by dying stars. A detailed study of NGC 3576, also known as NGC 3582 and NGC 3584, uncovered at least 33 massive stars in the end stages of formation, and the clear presence of the complex carbon molecules known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAHs are thought to be created in the cooling gas of star forming regions, and their development in the Sun's formation nebula five billion years ago may have been an important step in the development of life on Earth. The featured image was taken at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile.
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#amazing #astronomy #beauty #chandra #bible #bibletext #nasabeyond #constellation #creation #galaxy #hubble #hubbletelescope #interstellar #nature #nasa #cosmos #hubblehangout #space #universe #scripture #naturelovers #cosmology #science #hst 1453389264393008333_561112395

#repost@thehubblescope with @repostapp ・・・ NGC 3576: Statue of Liberty Nebula . "And for their sakes I sanctify myself, that they also might be sanctified through the truth." . What's happening in the Statue of Liberty nebula? Bright stars and interesting molecules are forming and being liberated. The complex nebula resides in the star forming region called RCW 57. This image showcases dense knots of dark interstellar dust, bright stars that have formed in the past few million years, fields of glowing hydrogen gas ionized by these stars, and great loops of gas expelled by dying stars. A detailed study of NGC 3576, also known as NGC 3582 and NGC 3584, uncovered at least 33 massive stars in the end stages of formation, and the clear presence of the complex carbon molecules known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAHs are thought to be created in the cooling gas of star forming regions, and their development in the Sun's formation nebula five billion years ago may have been an important step in the development of life on Earth. The featured image was taken at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. . #amazing #astronomy #beauty #chandra #bible #bibletext #nasabeyond #constellation #creation #galaxy #hubble #hubbletelescope #interstellar #nature #nasa #cosmos #hubblehangout #space #universe #scripture #naturelovers #cosmology #science #hst

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View maxholden1's Instagram #Repost @thehubblescope with @repostapp
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M16 and the Eagle Nebula
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"Ye are my friends, if ye do whatsoever I command you."
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A star cluster around 2 million years young surrounded by natal clouds of dust and glowing gas, M16 is also known as The Eagle Nebula. This beautifully detailed image of the region includes cosmic sculptures made famous in Hubble Space Telescope close-ups of the starforming complex. Described as elephant trunks or Pillars of Creation, dense, dusty columns rising near the center are light-years in length but are gravitationally contracting to form stars. Energetic radiation from the cluster stars erodes material near the tips, eventually exposing the embedded new stars. Extending from the ridge of bright emission left of center is another dusty starforming column known as the Fairy of Eagle Nebula. M16 and the Eagle Nebula lie about 7,000 light-years away, an easy target for binoculars or small telescopes in a nebula rich part of the sky toward the split constellation Serpens Cauda (the tail of the snake).
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#amazing #astronomy #beauty #chandra #bible #bibletext #nasabeyond #constellation #creation #galaxy #hubble #hubbletelescope #interstellar #nature #nasa #cosmos #hubblehangout #space #universe #scripture #naturelovers #cosmology #science #hst 1453385893791635157_561112395

#repost@thehubblescope with @repostapp ・・・ M16 and the Eagle Nebula . "Ye are my friends, if ye do whatsoever I command you." . A star cluster around 2 million years young surrounded by natal clouds of dust and glowing gas, M16 is also known as The Eagle Nebula. This beautifully detailed image of the region includes cosmic sculptures made famous in Hubble Space Telescope close-ups of the starforming complex. Described as elephant trunks or Pillars of Creation, dense, dusty columns rising near the center are light-years in length but are gravitationally contracting to form stars. Energetic radiation from the cluster stars erodes material near the tips, eventually exposing the embedded new stars. Extending from the ridge of bright emission left of center is another dusty starforming column known as the Fairy of Eagle Nebula. M16 and the Eagle Nebula lie about 7,000 light-years away, an easy target for binoculars or small telescopes in a nebula rich part of the sky toward the split constellation Serpens Cauda (the tail of the snake). . #amazing #astronomy #beauty #chandra #bible #bibletext #nasabeyond #constellation #creation #galaxy #hubble #hubbletelescope #interstellar #nature #nasa #cosmos #hubblehangout #space #universe #scripture #naturelovers #cosmology #science #hst

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